News, State Feed

Governor makes additional funds available for COVID-19-impacted renters and homeowners

The Governor announced additional funds for the CARES Act to support Iowa renters and homeowners at-risk of eviction or foreclosure due to a COVID-19-related loss of income, on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.

The Iowa Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention program has now allocated a total of $37.4 million, with approximately $8 million remaining available. The deadline to apply for rent and mortgage assistance as well as utility assistance through the Iowa Residential Utility Disruption Prevention program is Dec. 4, 2020.  

The programs are funded through federal CARES Act funds, which requires that all funds be used by Dec. 30, 2020.  

To be eligible for either program: 

  • Must have a documented COVID-19-related loss of income on or after March 17, 2020. 
  • Household income at the time of application may not exceed 80% median family income, which varies by county and household size and is included in the applications.

To learn more about the program, visit iowahousingrecovery.com and make sure to apply on or before Dec. 4, 2020. For more Iowa City COVID-19 information and resources, visit icgov.org/Coronavirus.


Governor requires masks in all indoor spaces open to the public starting Nov. 17, 2020

On Monday, Nov. 16, 2020, the Governor issued a new order mandating that masks be worn in all indoor spaces open to the public starting at midnight on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020.

The mandate will be effective until Dec. 11, 2020. This measure comes as Johnson County and Iowa as a whole experiences a dramatic surge in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. 

Along with the mask order, the Governor issued several other mitigation efforts, including:

  • Prohibiting indoor gatherings of more than 15 people.
  • Prohibiting outdoor gatherings of more than 30 people. 
  • Closing restaurants and bars for indoor services at 10 p.m.

High school sports have not been prohibited, but the Governor announced several new measures for such events. To read the entire declaration, visit the Governor's website.

The City's face covering mandate remains in-place, and can be read online. For more information about COVID-19 and the City, visit our COVID-19 resources website


Governor requires masks at indoor gatherings of 25 or more; continues COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Declaration

On Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, the Governor updates the State's Public Health Emergency Declaration,  extending all in-place health mitigation efforts through Nov. 30, 2020. 

The latest declaration also added more mitigation efforts, including:

  • Requiring masks at all indoor gatherings of 25 people or more and all outdoor events of 100 people or more.
  • Requiring masks for employees and customers at businesses like salons, barbershops, massage therapy establishments, tattoo parlors, and other personal service businesses.
  • Groups of eight or more are prohibited at bars, restaurants, and any gathering of a social, community, recreational, leisure, or sporting nature, unless the entire group is from the same household. 

These new measure will be effective at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, and will continue until 11:59 p.m. Nov. 30, 2020. 

Other in-place health mitigation steps include social distancing at restaurants, bars, and other business establishments, as well as other gatherings of 10 or more people. 

To read the entire declaration, visit the Governor's website.

The City's face covering mandate remains in-place, and can be read online. For more information about COVID-19 and the City, visit our COVID-19 resources website


SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans available to Iowa Small Businesses

Small nonfarm businesses in eight Iowa counties are now eligible to apply for low‑interest federal disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration. These loans offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the derecho in the following primary county that occurred August. 10, 2020.

Primary county: Iowa.

Neighboring counties: Benton, Johnson, Keokuk, Linn, Poweshiek, Tama and Washington.

“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Director Tanya N. Garfield of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West said.

Small nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture, and most private nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

“Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage. These loans have an interest rate of 3% for businesses and 2.75% for private nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years, and are available to small businesses and most private nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.

By law, SBA makes Economic Injury Disaster Loans available when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture designates an agricultural disaster. The Secretary declared this disaster on Oct. 30, 2020.

Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance. Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency about the U.S. Department of Agriculture assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration.

Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications online. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call 800-877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, Texas, 76155.

The deadline to apply for economic injury is June 30, 2021.


Trump Administration Invests Over $747,000 in Rural Community Facilities in Iowa

Health Clinics, Emergency Equipment and Public Safety Facilities Will Benefit Over 40,000 Iowans

DES MOINES, – The Trump Administration, along with U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development State Director for Iowa Grant Menke, today announced that the USDA is investing $747,700 in 22 projects to improve essential community facilities in rural Iowa. These projects, funded through the Community Facilities Direct Loan and Grant Program and Community Facilities Disaster Grant Program, will benefit 40,788 rural residents in Iowa.

“Investing in essential community facilities is a key component of improving quality of life in rural Iowa, and that’s why these 22 projects are so noteworthy,” said Menke. “Under the leadership of President Trump and Secretary Perdue, USDA continues to be a strong partner to rural communities, because we know that when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

The following 22 project investments announced today will be utilized to upgrade a health care facility and library, to assist in purchasing emergency equipment and vehicles, and to make necessary street and sidewalk improvements:

  • The City of Albia will use a $101,100 grant to purchase a truck dump box, slide-in stainless steel sander, reversible plow, and related equipment to be installed on an existing chassis to be used for maintenance of city streets, street cleaning, snow removal and treatment for ice and snow.  This equipment will replace worn out equipment and save repair costs and maintenance issues. The grant will also allow the city to purchase SCBA breathing equipment and other related equipment to be used by the City of Albia's Fire Department.  This will replace the Fire Department's old and outdated equipment, making it compliant with current NFPA standards.  This will help improve the quality of life for rural residents.
  • The City of Creston will use a $41,400 grant to purchase a MILO Range Mobile Situational Awareness Training System (M-SATS) mobile firearms and force options simulator.  The unit will provide officers with training situations, save time and travel resources, and better equip the officers in real life situations. The grant will also allow the city to purchase a new patrol vehicle.  Updated vehicles will help the police department safely serve the community.
  • The Friendship Home Association will use a $50,000 grant to make improvements to the two elevators located in the three-level facility.  Updates will bring the facility into compliance with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Rules of Participation.
  • The City of New Market is receiving a $24,000 grant to purchase an electronic sign for the community.  The sign will be used to get important information out to the city such as boil orders or COVID-19 crisis information that will help enhance the safety and awareness of the community.
  • The City of Moulton will use a $7,700 grant to purchase new SCBA face masks, monitor and other related equipment which is needed to replace the fire department's old and outdated equipment.  The equipment will be used by the Moulton Fire Department and will help improve the quality of life for rural residents.
  • The City of Hastings is receiving a $30,000 grant to purchase a 12-lead cardiac monitor with defibrillation capabilities. Current equipment has become unreliable. The rescue department provides paramedic level care for the city and surrounding areas. This will improve the efficiency and safety of the rescue department and the community members they serve.
  • The City of Belle Plaine will use a $31,400 grant to purchase laptop computers, computer related equipment, and other equipment to help the department be more efficient. The equipment will be used to issue citations, reports, and complete accident reports on the scene. The grant will also allow the city to purchase a new law enforcement patrol vehicle for the city.  The car will be used to protect the community along with responding to public safety and emergency calls.
  • The City of Otho is receiving a $16,800 grant to purchase a generator for the city’s fire station.  The fire station serves as the designated shelter for the community in the event of an emergency.  The station currently runs on 100% electricity and has no backup generator.
  • The City of Farragut will use a $53,900 loan and a $24,100 grant to purchase a tractor and loader for the community.  It will be used to help maintain the streets and for snow removal.
  • The City of Seymour is receiving a $27,000 grant to purchase a patrol vehicle for the city of Seymour Law Enforcement Department. This project will help to replace a high-mileage vehicle with mechanical issues that are costly to repair. This vehicle will allow the city to continue providing efficient public safety services for the city's residents.
  • The City of Boyden will use a $3,300 grant to purchase and install a warning siren.  The existing siren is obsolete and cannot reach all local areas during severe weather situations, hindering the safety of the residents.
  • The City of Bedford is receiving a $50,000 grant to replace several streets and sidewalks in the community.  These streets are dilapidated and in need of repairs which will increase the safety and security of the residents of the city.
  • The Keokuk Public Library Foundation will use a $109,000 grant to purchase lighting, tables, chairs, screen and equipment for the library park.  The new park will have a reading and sculpture garden, plaza, open air amphitheater, and conservation areas.
  • The City of Russell is receiving a $40,900 grant to purchase a new skid loader and related equipment to be used for maintenance of the city streets and other general maintenance around the town.  This will help improve the quality of life for rural residents.
  • Sac City will use a $23,900 grant to purchase a law enforcement patrol vehicle and emergency services equipment.  This investment will replace an aging vehicle and equipment that are becoming costly to maintain and hinder the efficiency of law enforcement officers and safety of the community.
  • The City of Irwin will use a $50,000 grant to make necessary street and sidewalk improvements, furthermore, making them ADA compliant by adding designated parking spaces and required curb ramps for access to the sidewalks.  This will help improve the safety and quality of life for rural residents.
  • The City of Soldier is receiving a $13,200 grant to purchase maintenance equipment for the city of Soldier. The equipment will replace old and outdated equipment and will be used to help maintain city streets and property, improving quality of life for the city's residents.
  • The City of Corning will use a $50,000 grant to purchase a street sweeper for the city. The existing sweeper was purchased in 1994 and is beyond useful life. The new vehicle will help the city continue to provide necessary maintenance for the local residents.

Background:

USDA is investing in 22 projects in rural Iowa through the Community Facilities Direct Loan and Grant Program and Community Facilities Disaster Grant Program. These programs provide affordable funding to develop essential community facilities in rural areas. An essential community facility is defined as a facility that provides an essential service to the local community for the orderly development of the community in a rural area, and does not include private, commercial, or business undertakings.

More than 100 types of projects are eligible for Community Facilities funding. Eligible applicants include municipalities, public bodies, nonprofit organizations and federally recognized Native American tribes. Projects must be in rural areas with a population of 20,000 or less.

Interested parties should contact their local USDA Rural Development Iowa Office for information about additional funding, application procedures and eligibility details. The Community Facilities Direct Loan Program Guidance Book for Applicants also provides a detailed overview of the application process.

USDA Rural Development has 11 offices across the state to serve the 1.7 million residents living in rural Iowa. Office locations include a state office in Des Moines, along with local offices in Albia, Atlantic, Humboldt, Indianola, Iowa Falls, Le Mars, Mount Pleasant, Storm Lake, Tipton and Waverly. These offices help to provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas.


SUSTAINABLE IOWA LAND TRUST SPECIALIST: AGROFORESTRY CAN PROVIDE DIVERSIFIED, NEW REVENUE SOURCE FOR FARMERS

SiltWEST BRANCH, Iowa – As Iowa farmers consider ways to create more stable incomes, they could consider diversifying their operations with an approach popularized by a Canadian forestry expert, Jonathan Hendricks, agroforestry specialist with the Sustainable Iowa Land Trust, said today.

 

“A look at the history of agriculture tells us that the concept has been around for centuries, but modern agroforestry was the brainchild of John Bene, who recognized and promoted the role of trees in agricultural production. Simply put, it involves growing crops purposefully along with trees or other woody plants. It can also involve raising livestock along with trees,” Hendricks said. “Both approaches include deriving income from the trees, such as nut or fruit trees or trees that are harvested for lumber.”

 

The Sustainable Iowa Land Trust (SILT) is a statewide nonprofit that works with landowners to permanently dedicate their land to table-food production and market farming. Hendricks, who recently joined its staff, helps land owners create long-range conservation plans or convert existing short-term plans into longer-action plans. His work is supported in part by an Iowa Conservation Innovation Grant and in partnership with the Savanna Institute. 

 

“Agroforestry delivers short-term and long-term benefits. The trees reduce soil erosion and the host plants for insects that feed on crops while improving nutrient recycling and sustaining the water table,” Hendricks said. “In a livestock operation, those trees provide shade and shelter for animals. And, over time, they generate income and provide a new revenue source for the farm operation.”

 

SILT executive director Suzan Erem said agroforestry techniques are also “one of the top solutions to combating climate change.”

 

“Planting trees with the vision and intention of protecting the land and growing food is an idea for those who operate on a long-term horizon and want to leave a strong foundation for future generations. That describes Iowa farmers to a T,” Erem said. “We’re thrilled to have Jonathan with us now to help farmers and landowners across the state develop effective, long-term plans to create the kind of legacy that will make the future generations proud.”


Additional energy bill funds available this year for some low-income MidAmerican Energy customers

Several states add to annual seasonal energy bill assistance for customers with COVID-19 financial losses 

DES MOINES, Iowa – (Oct. 28, 2020) – Customers struggling to pay their energy bills may qualify for additional assistance this year if they also experienced COVID-19-related income losses, as several states have added pandemic relief funds on top of their annual low-income home energy assistance programs, or LIHEAP.

“More customers are facing financial hardship than in years past, due to this year’s challenges,” Mike Gehringer, vice president of customer operations for MidAmerican, said. “We encourage those customers to apply for LIHEAP, additional COVID-19 assistance to those who qualify, and contact us to discuss available payment options.” Customers concerned about their energy bill should call MidAmerican at 888-427-5632.

LIHEAP
LIHEAP helps low-income families pay their heating bills. The program provides winter heating assistance to qualifying customers. Each state receives and administers funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services block grants, so programs vary by state.

  • Illinois LIHEAP
    To be eligible for LIHEAP in Illinois, the total household income for an applicant must be at or below 200% of 2020 federal poverty guidelines. For example, a single-person household is eligible with an annual gross income at or below $25,520, and a family of four is eligible with an annual gross income at or below $52,400.

Customers are encouraged to apply as soon as possible for LIHEAP to ensure they receive the assistance they need. The program will accept applications through May 31, 2021. To apply, Illinois residents in Rock Island, Mercer and Henry counties should contact Project NOW, Inc. at www.projectnow.org or 309-793-6391. Residents can also call the state’s LIHEAP hotline at 877-411-WARM (9276). 

  • Iowa LIHEAP
    Community action agencies in Iowa review applications and administer grant funds. Household income and size, type of primary heating fuel, housing type and other factors are considered.

To be eligible for LIHEAP in Iowa, the total household income for an applicant must be at or below 175% of 2020 federal poverty guidelines. For example, a single-person household is eligible with an annual gross income at or below $22,330. A family of four is eligible with an annual gross income at or below $45,850.

Eligible customers who need help with energy bills should apply for LIHEAP at a local community action agency. The Iowa Department of Human Rights has additional information about the program and eligibility requirements. 

  • Nebraska LIHEAP
    The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services administers the state’s LIHEAP assistance.

To be eligible for LIHEAP in Nebraska, the total household income for an applicant must be at or below 130% of 2020 federal poverty guidelines. For example, a single-person household can qualify with an annual gross income at or below $16,588, and a family of four can qualify with an annual gross income at or below $34,060.

Nebraska customers can apply for assistance through March 31, 2021 for the 2020-2021 heating season. LIHEAP application forms are available through the ACCESSNebraska website, by phone at 800-383-4278, or at a local Nebraska DHHS office. 

  • South Dakota LIEAP
    South Dakota’s Department of Social Services distributes Low-Income Energy Assistance Program funds on a first-come, first-served basis. Eligibility for South Dakota’s LIEAP is based on the number of people residing in the home, type and cost of heating, and the household income. For example, a single-person household can qualify with a maximum 3-month income of $6,380 or less and a four-person household can qualify with a maximum 3-month income of $12,969 or less.

South Dakota LIEAP application forms are available at the South Dakota Department of Social Services website, by phone at 800-233-8503 or at local DSS offices.

Additional pandemic-related utility bill relief

Several states currently offer limited-time pandemic-related utility bill and utility debt assistance if they experienced a COVID-19-related loss:

  • Illinois: MidAmerican Energy customers in Rock Island, Mercer and Henry counties who have been financially impacted by COVID-19 may qualify for additional utility bill assistance, based on their income. To apply, contact Project NOW, Inc. at projectnow.org or 309-793-6391. Limited funds are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Iowa: The Iowa Residential Utility Disruption Prevention Program provides eligible households with up to $2,000 toward certain utility services, including electric and natural gas, if they are at risk of disconnection due to an inability to pay due to a COVID-19-related income loss. More information about the program is available at iowafinance.com or by calling 515-348-8976. The application deadline is November 20, 2020.

  • South Dakota: The South Dakota CARES Housing Assistance Program provides qualifying South Dakota residents up to $1,500 per month in temporary housing expenses, including utility bills, if they have experienced a particular COVID-19-related loss. More information is available at sdhda.org or by calling 211. The application deadline is December 18, 2020.

Budget billing provides predictable monthly bill

MidAmerican Energy customers who want a more consistent monthly energy bill can opt for budget billing, which allows customers to pay the same amount each month for a set period of time. Budget billing does not lower rates but does offer a more predictable bill. 

How you can help low-income customers this winter

To help those in need, customers can donate to MidAmerican Energy’s I CARE program. I CARE funds local assistance for heating bills and home weatherization for low-income residents and is administered through local community action agencies.

Customer donations fund I CARE, together with a 25% match from MidAmerican Energy. Tax-deductible donations to the I CARE program stay within the local community and go directly to help those in need. MidAmerican Energy customers can donate to the I CARE program via a checkbox on their monthly bill or can pledge online. 

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves more than 791,000 electric customers in Iowa, Illinois and South Dakota, and 771,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican is available at MidAmericanEnergy.com and company social media channels.


SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans available to Iowa small businesses impacted by derecho

Small nonfarm businesses in 12 Iowa counties and a neighboring county in Illinois are now eligible to apply for low‑interest federal disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration, announced Director Tanya N. Garfield of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West. These loans offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the derecho in the following primary counties that occurred Aug. 10, 2020.
 
Primary Iowa counties:  Grundy and Muscatine;
Neighboring Iowa counties:  Black Hawk, Butler, Cedar, Franklin, Hardin, Johnson, Louisa, Marshall, Scott and Tama;
Neighboring Illinois county:  Rock Island.
 
“SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Garfield said.
 
Small nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.
 
“Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage. These loans have an interest rate of 3 percent for businesses and 2.75 percent for private nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years and are available to small businesses and most private nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.
 
By law, SBA makes Economic Injury Disaster Loans available when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture designates an agricultural disaster. The Secretary declared this disaster on Oct. 20, 2020.
 
Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance. Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency about the U.S. Department of Agriculture assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration.
 
Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX  76155.
 
The deadline to apply for economic injury is June 21, 2021.

Trump Administration Invests over $300,000 to Boost Rural Iowa Ag Producers and Small Businesses

Des Moines, Iowa, The Trump Administration, along with U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development State Director for Iowa Grant Menke, today announced that the USDA is investing over $300,000 to assist four Iowa agricultural producers in developing new value-added products and expanding their business lines. These funding awards were made through USDA Rural Development’s Value-Added Producer Grant (VAPG) program.

“Rural Iowa communities would not exist without agriculture—our towns and cities were built on the backs of family farms and small businesses,” said Menke. “Through the Value-Added Producer Grant program, Rural Development fosters growth and expansion leading to increased income for ag producers.  Under the leadership of President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Perdue, USDA continues to work tirelessly to be a strong partner to rural Iowa in building stronger and healthier farms and communities, because we know when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

In Iowa, four (4) agricultural producers have been selected to receive a total of $303,265 in VAPG funding:

  • North Iowa Fresh, LLC, Located in Clear Lake, Iowa, has been selected to receive a $23,500 grant.  The investment will be used as working capital to expand the marketing of locally produced fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Southern Iowa Alpacas, LLC, in Albia, Iowa, has been selected to receive a $49,775 grant.  The investment will be used for working capital to process alpaca fiber into decorative pillows. Project funds will also be used for market expansion of the value-added product.
  • Pivo Blepta, LLC, in Calmar, Iowa, has been selected to receive a $49,990 grant.  The investment will be used for working capital to expand its hard cider production and sales produced from locally grown apples and pears.
  • Fox Ridge Farm, Inc. (dba Wilson’s Orchard) in Solon, Iowa, has been selected to receive a $180,000 grant.  Project funds will be used by the family-owned orchard as working capital for processing and marketing its new high tannin, low sugar apple crop into European-style dry cider.

USDA is investing in these rural Iowa projects through the Value-Added Producer Grant (VAPG) program. VAPG funds may be used for planning activities or working capital expenses related to producing or marketing a value-added product including feasibility studies, business plans, processing of the value-added product, logo and website development, and marketing and distribution. Independent agricultural producers, farmer or rancher cooperatives, and producer-controlled entities are eligible to apply.  Grants are awarded through a national competition—each fiscal year, applications are requested through a notice published in the Federal Register and through an announcement posted on Grants.gov.

Interested parties should contact their USDA Rural Development Iowa Office for information about additional funding, application procedures and eligibility details. More information is available at the following link: Value-Added Producer Grants.

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas.

For more information, visit rd.usda.gov/ia or call (515) 284-4663.

Follow us on Twitter @RD_Iowa.


Governor continues Public Health Emergency Declaration due to COVID-19

On Friday, Oct. 16, 2020, the Governor extended the State's Public Health Emergency Declaration. 

The declaration extended all in-place health mitigation efforts through Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020. 

In-place health mitigation steps include social distancing at restaurants, bars, and other business establishments, as well as social, community, recreational, leisure, or sporting gatherings of 10 or more people. 

To read the entire declaration, visit the Governor's website.

The City's face covering mandate also remains in-place, and can be read online. For more information about COVID-19 and the City, visit our COVID-19 resources website