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October 2022

Butter shortage predicted ahead of the holidays, stock up at Aldi, it's cheaper than the mainstream grocery store

By Mike Thayer

20220623_124022(2)The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is predicting a butter shortage, reporting there is 22% less butter in storage than there was at this time last year.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics has also chimed in, stating butter costs 24% more than it did in October 2021.

Just ahead of the holidays, this is when Americans do more cooking and A LOT of baking. The timing couldn't be worse.  A butter shortage?  Seriously?  Labor shortages and supply chain issues are to blame for the decreased supply, and increased costs for dairy farmers were cited for the price hike.  Thanks Joe!

Countryside Creamery Unsalted Butter
Another example of how Aldi is cheaper than the mainstream grocery store.  And I walked in with butter being the only item on my list and walked out with just the butter!  I denied myself impulse buys.  Unprecedented...

I found myself with a bit of a butter shortage this morning, down to my last two sticks and some batch cooking on the agenda today.  I was also out of coffee creamer and stamps, so off to the mainstream grocery store I went for some one-stop shopping.  You can't buy stamps at Aldi and I like the Kroger brand of coffee creamer better than what Aldi now offers (they no longer sell Friendly Farms creamer) and the price difference is negligible.  I got my stamps, grabbed a jug of coffee creamer, walked over to the fridge with the butter and saw the prices...  The cheapest one pound box (4 sticks) was the Kroger brand at $4.99. Land O'Lakes was priced at $5.49 and Tillamook (love their cheese) was priced at $5.79.  The cheapest butter on the shelf was Kerrygold Grass Fed Pure Irish Butter at $3.50, but that was for just 8 ounces.

Hello Aldi!

Regular readers know that I for the most part don't get hung up over name brands.  While I do hold a few preferences where I go with the name brand, when it comes to food, not so much.   At Aldi, I purchased a one pound box (4 sticks) of Countryside Creamery Unsalted Butter for $3.98 plus tax.  That's $1 cheaper than the Kroger brand and entirely worth the six minute drive to Aldi and the extra stop.  Butter is butter, I don't need the name brand stuff to cook or bake with, I've never paused and thought, "Oh my, this butter is SO much better tasting than brand 'X'!"...  Butter is butter.

So plan ahead for your holiday baking and cooking, beat the shortage and stock up on butter at Aldi.  The price of butter is just another example of how Aldi is cheaper product for product than the mainstream grocery store.  A good plan B is to buy bulk at Costco or Sam's Club, you'll save there over the mainstream grocery store as well.

Other Predicted Shortages:  If you're hosting a Thanksgiving dinner, it's never too early to start planning that menu.  Even if you're not hosting, but you're asked or want to contribute to the feast, it's a good time to plan ahead.  Prices are up and shortages on Thanksgiving staples are predicted, so getting what you need now in beating the last minute Thanksgiving rush crowd would be a very good thing.  Shortages have been predicted for butter, cream cheese (just about any dairy product in fact), chocolate, corn, tomatoes, beer, turkeys, olive oil, frozen pies and even frozen pizza (a traditional no fuss dinner the day before Thanksgiving for many). 

$pend Wisely My Friends...

 

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Product Review: Lalahoni Garden Obelisk Trellis

Garden Obelisk Trellis
Easy Assembly

By Mike Thayer

I love climbing plants and it doesn't matter if it's flowers or veggies, morning glories, roses, climatis vine, sweet peas, vucumber, tomatoes, pole beans, you name it.  Climbing plants provide a nice vertical visual appeal to the garden and going vertical can save on valuable veggie garden space.

If you don't have a fence to take advantage of, a trellis will do the trick in going vertical.  I like trellises better than tomato cages and the like, they just have a better look, presenting a cleaner, permanent feel. Bonus:  You don't have to remove and store a trellis during the winter months like you do with cages, you can leave a trellis in place.  Trellises range greatly in size, material, shape and most notably, price.  You can easily pay $100 for a trellis, that would be for something large and elaborate, fortunately, if in need of a decent sized trellis, you don't have to pay near that much.

Garden Obelisk Trellis
Metal bars in a plastic casing

Enter the Garden Obelisk Trellis by Lalahoni

Rustproof, sturdy yet lightweight, this trellis is ideal for climbing plants, inside, out in the veggie garden or as part of your flowering landscape.  Versatile, you can place it directly in the ground or place it in a large container.  At six feet tall and 12 inches wide, this trellis is great for training climbing plants, allowing them to showcase their beauty.

Constructed of metal poles with a plastic casing, the plastic contains UV inhibitors to resist sun damage and fading.  The plastic support rings are adjustable, allowing you to 'custom fit' a variety of plants.  The obelisk shape maximizes plant growth, resulting in a more robust foliage and flower display or making it far easier to grab that veggie harvest.

The trellis was easy to assemble, from the time I started opening the box until it was fully assembled took like 10 minutes.  The instructions were clear, there were no issues putting it all together and there were no missing parts.

Garden Obelisk Trellis
A Morning Glory on the front porch

Costing me $25.99 on Amazon, I'm giving the Lalahoni Garden Obelisk Trellis 4 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  It's a good looking lightweight trellis that works really well in large pots, supporting plants such as morning glory and equally well placed directly in the ground supporting cucumber and pole beans making this repeat buy worthy.  I have found however that sturdier, heavier plants such as tomatoes and climbing rose can displace the plastic support rings.  Using a zip tie easily secures them in place.

4 stars

Related: Planting potatoes using ANPHSIN 10 Gallon Garden Potato Grow Bags

$pend Wisely My Friends...

Related:  Taco Challenge 2022

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If you appreciate the article you just read and want to support more great content on BachelorontheCheap.com, you can help keep this site going with a one-time or a monthly donation.  Thank you so much for your support! ~ Mike

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