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January 2017

Carb-Check Diet: Eat any kind of fish you want, just not breaded or battered

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it!

Fish and shellfish are excellent sources of protein.  You can eat just about any kind of fish and not have to worry about blowing up your carb count.   Most shellfish by the very nature of their diet, tend to carry more carbs than fish.  The only real rule of thumb here, don't eat fish that's been breaded or battered.

Carb Count:  Fish & Shellfish

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Anchovies, canned in oil 6 oz. 0
Bass, all varieties 6 oz. 0
Catfish, all varieties 6 oz. 0
Clams, canned or fresh 2 oz. 3
Cod 6 oz. 0
Crab 6 oz. 0
Crawfish 6 oz. 1
Eel 6 oz. 0
Flounder 6 oz. 0
Grouper 6 oz. 0
Halibut 6 oz. 0
Herring, cured 2 oz. 0
Herring, pickled 2 oz. 5.4
Lobster 6 oz. 1.8
Mackerel 6 oz. 0
Mahi-mahi 6 oz. 0
Mussels 2 oz. 4
Oysters 2 oz. 6
Perch 6 oz. 0
Salmon, canned, fresh, smoked 6 oz. 0
Sardines, canned, in oil 6 oz. 0
Sardines, canned in tomato sauce 6 oz. 0.8
Scallops 6 oz. 4
Shrimp 6 oz. 3
Squid 6 oz. 6.5
Tilapia 6 oz. 0
Trout, all varieties 6 oz. 0
Tuna, canned or fresh 6 oz. 0
Walleye 6 oz. 0

 

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Carb-Check Diet: Dairy products are fine in moderation

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it!

Milk, cheese, creams....  They're all excellent additions to meals you can prepare with the Carb-Check Diet, dairy products make for great snacks too!  Caution though, although many dairy products pack some pretty good protein, they have some carbs too, so moderation is key.  As a general rule of thumb, most cheeses that you can slice or shred, are under 1 gram of carbohydrate per ounce.

Carb Count:  Dairy & Eggs

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Butter 1 Tablespoon 0
Cheese, American 1 slice 0.5
Cheese, Blue 1 oz. 0.7
Cheese, Cheddar 1 oz. 0.5
Cheese, Colby 1 oz. 0.7
Cheese, Feta 1 oz. 1.2
Cheese, Goat 1 oz. 0.6
Cheese, Monterey Jack 1 oz. 1.2
Cheese, Mozzarella 1 oz. 0.6
Cheese, Parmesan, Grated 1 Tablespoon 0
Cheese, Swiss 1 oz. 1.5
Cheese, Velveeta 1 oz. 3
Cheese Whiz 2 Tablespoons 4
Coffee Creamer 1 Tablespoon 5
Cottage Cheese 1/2 cup 5
Cream Cheese 2 Tablespoons 1.5
Cream, Heavy 1 Tablespoon 0
Eggs, Large 1 0.7
Half & Half 1 Tablespoon 0.3
Margarine 1 Tablespoon 0.1
Milk, Whole 1 cup 12
Milk, 2% 1 cup 12
Sour Cream 2 Tablespoons 1

 


Carb-Check Diet: Veggies provide you with all the carbs you need, no pasta, rice, potatoes, bread, chips required......

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it!

Veggies are the key element to the Carb-Check Diet.  Eating vegetables means eating GOOD carbs.  Veggie carbs REPLACE the bad carbs that are breads, pastas, rice, potatoes and chips.  Know that eating something like avacado, in let's say a guacamole dip, is WAY better in diet terms than say, eating pasta (1 cup of cooked pasta has about 42 grams in carbs).....  and yes, guacamole is THAT good!

Carb Count:  Veggies

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Asparagus 1 cup 8
Avacado 1 cup 13
Broccoli 1 cup 6
Brussel Sprouts 1 cup 12
Cabbage 1 cup 5
Carrots 1 cup 12
Cauliflower 1 cup 5
Celery 1 cup 3
Cucumber 1 cup 4
Eggplant 1 cup 8
Garlic 1 clove 1
Green Beans 1 cup 10
Kale 1 cup 7
Lettuce 1 cup 2
Mushrooms 1 cup 2
Onions 1 cup 12
Peppers 1 cup 9
Radish 1 cup 4
Spaghetti Squash 1 cup 7
Spinach 1 cup 7
Tomato 1 cup 6
Yellow Squash 1 cup 7
Zucchini 1 cup 4

 


Pork is a staple in the Carb-Check Diet, it's loaded with protein and the price is right!

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it! No real worries though when it comes to eating pork.  I eat a lot of pork in this diet, it's an excellent source of protein and the price is right!

Carb Count:  Pork

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Bacon 3 slices 0.5
Bratwurst 1 link 1
Canadian Bacon 3 slices 1.4
Chops 6 oz. 0
Ground Pork Quarter Pound 0
Ham 6 oz. 0
Little Smokies 5 links 2
Loin 6 oz. 0
Lunch Meat, ham, smoked 6 slices 1
Lunch Meat, ham, honey 6 slices 3
Ribs 6 oz. 0
Roasts 6 oz. 0
Sausage, breakfast, patty Quarter Pound 0
Sausage, breakfast, link 3 links 0
Stew Meat 6 oz. 0
Pepperoni 14 slices 1.5
Spam 2 oz. 1.7

 


Carb-Check Diet: Chicken and Turkey meats are USUALLY carb-free

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it!

Chicken & Turkey is USUALLY carb-free, but there's a caveat.  Be careful when it comes to packaged chicken and turkey sausages and burgers.  Read those labels.  Most brands are fine, but keep in mind that chicken and turkey are lean meats and so in grinding these meats, well, they naturally lack a lot of flavor.  Manufacturers of chicken/turkey sausages and the like use a lot of other ingredients/fillers (which means carbs) in making those products taste good.   

Carb Count:  Chicken & Turkey

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Dark meat (chicken or turkey, skin or no skin) 6 oz. 0
White meat (chicken or turkey, skin or no skin) 6 oz. 0
Ground chicken Quarter pound 0
Ground turkey Quarter pound 0
Lunch Meat, chicken, oven roasted 6 slices 2
Lunch Meat, turkey, oven roasted 6 slices 1
Lunch Meat, turkey, smoked 6 slices 1
Hot Dogs, chicken 1 link 2.5
Hot Dogs, turkey 1 link 3
Sausage, chicken w/apple 1 link 5
Sausage, chicken w/spinach & feta 1 link 1
Sausage, chicken w/tomato & basil 1 link 2

 


You don't really have to worry about carbs when eating beef

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it! No real worries though when it comes to eating beef.

Carb Count:  Beef

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Brisket 6 oz. 0
Corned Beef 6 oz. 1
Ground Beef Quarter Pound 0
Hot Dogs 1 link 4
Jerky 1 oz. 1
Lunch Meat, Bologna 3 slices 1
Lunch Meat, Pastrami 6 slices 1
Lunch Meat, Roast Beef 6 slices 0.5
Ribs 6 oz. 0
Roast 6 oz. 0
Salami 3 slices 1
Steak, any cut 6 oz. 0
Stew Meat 6 oz. 0
Summer Sausage 1 oz. 0.5

 

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Bachelor on the Cheap: Stretching your food dollar until payday

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Payday isn't for another couple days and you've got just a few bucks in your wallet....  What are you going to eat over the next few days?

Been there, done that.

That's why it's SO important to have a well stocked pantry, to be able to make and eat good food until that next paycheck hits the bank account.

When you've got cash in your pocket, there are those times when it's tempting and all too easy to stop at that convenient fast food joint or order a pizza.....  Don't do it.  Head to the grocery store instead.   Invest that money you are tempted to spend on junk food, on stocking up your pantry instead.   Investing in pantry items is like money in the bank, when those lean $ days hit, you have no frets about how you're going to feed yourself.

Regular readers know that I've written about the importance of having a well stocked pantry and what to put in it before.  If you're new to this site, or you wish to review that pantry list, you can read up on that here: 

Bachelor on the Cheap: Essential must haves for stocking your pantry and fridge

When you're short on bucks, it's nice to be able to just reach into the pantry and fridge/freezer and pull out some ingredients to make a pot of chili, or put together some kind of chicken dish for example.   There's no reason to worry about what you're going to eat with just three simple planning steps.

STEP 1:  Every time you are tempted to eat fast food or order a pizza, head to the grocery store instead, $7 spent on a burger and fries goes WAY farther at the grocery store....  You know this, so to borrow a line from Nike, "Just do it."  Invest your money in the ability to create multiple meals, not just one (fast food) or two (pizza).

STEP 2:    If you don't like to cook, learn.  This is a life skill, heck, a survival skill.  Know how to feed yourself, don't depend on others to do it for you.  Side benefit:  Family, friends and more importantly that special someone, likes that skill in you.  If you already know how to cook, kudos, go to Step 3.

STEP 3:  Meal plan and grocery shop based on what you have and/or don't have in your pantry.  These things go hand in hand.  Knowing what you want to eat and having it at the ready = making it happen.

Yes, it's that simple.  Buying a pizza typically costs around $20 and that's two meals, maybe three, tops.  Spending $20 at the grocery store gets you a variety of canned and/or dried goods; soups, vegetables, meats, etc., that you can have on hand to create a number of some rather tasty meals with. 

Invest in a pantry, it's 'food' money in the bank.

Related, making something from the pantry/fridge:  Cream of Chicken Soup


Carb-Check Diet: Your best bet for breakfast - scrambled eggs

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Eggs are full of protein, protein that will satisfy your appetite and keep you feeling full until lunch time.

The best way to cook those eggs is scrambled.  Why?  Because you can add just about anything you want to them and making scrambled eggs is easier and faster than making an omelette. 

Eggs are Carb-Check Diet friendly and your best breakfast bet to starting off the day deliciously right!