Trucking Feed

FTR’s Trucking Conditions Index falls to 2.97 after February upturn but improvement steady

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The FTR Trucking Conditions Index (TCI) for March fell back to a reading of 2.97 after an upturn in February.

However, FTR sees the recent steady improvement in spot rates as an indication that a market-wide move to capacity tightness is on the way with a correlating upswing in the index throughout 2017 and into 2018.

FTR remains confident in the freight market for 2017, as the industry started the year with strong growth in the first quarter.

The forecast has moderated somewhat for the regulatory headwinds affecting trucking, but still expect them to have significant effect toward the end of 2017 and for most of 2018.

via www.thetrucker.com

Related:  Trucking Jobs


US trucking conditions poised for upswing

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – Trucking conditions in the US deteriorated in March, but rising spot market freight rates suggest capacity may be tightening.

The latest FTR Trucking Conditions Index (TCI) fell to a reading of 2.97 in March, after an upturn in February. The industry forecaster is projecting an upswing in market conditions for truckers throughout 2017 and into 2018.

“The TCI has settled into a positive, but not robust, level of market conditions over the last 12 months. The main reasons for the reduction in the March TCI stems from slightly weaker freight activity, reduced estimates of capacity tightness, and continued weaker-than-expected conditions for contract rates,” explained Jonathan Starks, chief operating officer of FTR.

“Trucking conditions are likely to stay in this moderate range until late this year when the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate comes into effect. Once you combine the productivity hit coming from full implementation of ELDs with continued freight growth and the capacity reductions that have already occurred, you get a market that is poised to see significant movement in rates.”

via www.trucknews.com

Related:  Trucking Jobs


Examining the Trump effect on trucking

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – What can the trucking industry expect from the pro-business Donald Trump administration? Ironically, it could be higher taxes.

Noel Perry, truck and transportation expert with industry analyst FTR, said during the most recent State of Freight webinar that somebody will have to pay for Trump’s planned infrastructure investments – and it could be the trucking industry. Trucking could also be called on to fund increases in social program spending, as the US demographic ages, he added.

Perry said Trump could raise the money to fund his trillion dollar infrastructure promise through the issuing of bonds, road tolls, or other forms of taxation. The trucking industry in the US currently pays about five cents a mile in taxes. Perry said that could climb to 15-20 cents a mile if trucking is targeted through new taxes and road tolls to pay for infrastructure.

via www.trucknews.com

Related:  Trucking Jobs


Uber Buys Trucking Brokerage Firm

Uber hired the team behind a Chicago transportation brokerage last fall as part of an effort to break into the long-haul trucking industry.

All five employees from 4Front Logistics joined Uber in November, said an Uber spokeswoman, who added that Uber did not pay anything for the company. Brokerages such as 4Front Logistics connect manufacturers and retailers that are shipping goods with truck owners and fleets.

The deal comes as Uber is vying to apply the logistics expertise it has gained ferrying passengers in countries around the world to the trucking industry. That strategy puts it in the middle of a large, highly fragmented industry of freight brokers who match cargo with truck operators.

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick posted a photo on Twitter on Sunday of a large white truck emblazoned with the words “Uber Freight.”

via fortune.com

Related:  Trucking Jobs


Celadon Trucking Services named 2017 MVE for military employment

INDIANAPOLIS – Celadon Trucking Services has been named a winner in the 2017 Most Valuable Employers (MVE) for Military competition from RecruitMilitary, a national company helping employers connect with high-quality veterans.

The MVE recognition serves to help military-experienced job seekers identify the top employers to target for civilian careers.

MVEs are selected annually based on those employers whose recruiting, training, and retention plans best serve military service members and veterans.

“Veterans truly represent the finest talent our country has to offer,” said Peter Gudmundsson, president of RecruitMilitary. “Judging by the stature of the businesses that comprise the Most Valuable Employers for Military winners, we can see that organizations thrive when they include veteran hiring initiatives in their human resource strategies.”

via www.thetrucker.com


ATA taking applications for Trucking Image Award

SAN ANTONIO, TX – The American Trucking Associations (ATA) has announced it is now accepting applications for this year’s Mike Russell Trucking Image Award.

"The trucking industry has seen increasing respect in Washington in recent months, but we still have work to do on improving the image of our industry throughout North America," said Chris Spear, president and Chief Executive Officer of the ATA. "The Mike Russell Trucking Image Award recognizes the time and energy put into shaping a stronger image of trucking by the men and women who work tirelessly to spread our industry's message of safety, essentiality and professionalism."

Sponsored by HireRight, the award is given to an individual, motor carrier, trucking organization and industry supplier who display commitment to helping all trucking industry stakeholders by showcasing the industry’s essentiality, safety-first mentality, and professionalism.

via www.todaystrucking.com


Trucking, construction interests challenge GHG regs

Even as truck makers and some of their biggest customers gathered to review—and praise—the latest and greatest in environmentally friendly technologies last week, others in trucking were petitioning the Trump administration to reconsider the fundamental premise that allowed the Obama EPA to regulate greenhouse gases (GHG) in heavy-duty vehicles. This comes as the new leadership at EPA has asked for additional time to review a pending appeal of a federal waiver that allows California to establish its own standards for diesel emissions.

The gist, as explained by Joe Rajkovacz, director of governmental affairs and communications for the Western States Trucking Assn., is that the petitioners object to the “forward-pushing mandates” imposed by EPA.

“We don’t have a quarrel with somebody who wants to pay the money to advance a technology standard,” he says. “But to have EPA—and by extension, the California Air Resources Board—force feeding these mandates onto the trucking industry, we consider an abuse of power.”

via fleetowner.com


ATA Calls Trucking Image Champions to Action

SAN ANTONIO -- Today, American Trucking Associations announced the beginning of its search to find and honor trucking's greatest industry advocates with this year's Mike Russell Trucking Image Award.

"The trucking industry has seen increasing respect in Washington in recent months, but we still have work to do on improving the image of our industry throughout North America," said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. "The Mike Russell Trucking Image Award recognizes the time and energy put into shaping a stronger image of trucking by the men and women who work tirelessly to spread our industry's message of safety, essentiality and professionalism."

Sponsored by HireRight for the third consecutive year, the award is given to an individual, motor carrier, trucking organization and industry supplier who exhibits a commitment to helping all trucking industry stakeholders by showcasing the industry's essentiality, safety-first mentality, and professionalism.

via www.prnewswire.com


Low unemployment complicates trucking's hiring plans

Trucking companies finding it hard to “seat” drivers in their tractors will have an even tougher time recruiting the skilled people they want to hire in coming months. The latest employment data from the US Census Bureau shows they’re already struggling, with trucking payroll numbers flat in April even as the US economy expands and unemployment dwindles.

That has implications for carriers, which have been adding trucks and expanding fleets in anticipation of stronger economic demand in the months ahead, and shippers that depend on the ready availability of trucks and drivers to haul goods and keep freight rates stable. There’s plenty of overcapacity right now in terms of trucks, but not, perhaps, when it comes to drivers.

The US economy added 211,000 jobs in April, pushing the national unemployment rate down to 4.4 percent, a new low that compares favorably with a 5 percent unemployment rate a year ago and a 4.8 percent rate in January. The last time the US unemployment rate was this low was exactly 10 years ago, in May 2007, according to US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data.

Economists have been talking about “full employment” since the unemployment rate hit 5 percent in late 2015. Full employment doesn’t mean everyone has a job, but that those who want a job can find one. The unemployment rate hasn’t been lower than 4.4 percent since May 2001, which means the United States is as close to full employment as its been in almost two decades.

via www.joc.com

Related:  Coralville Courier Jobs Board