News, Trucking Feed

Trucking industry needs 90,000 new drivers per year for next 10 years to meet demands

The American Trucking Associations estimates that America will need 90,000 new truck drivers on the road every year for the next decade to keep up with transport and shipping demands.

Some of the issues at the root of the problem include low unemployment rates, the lifestyle of living on the road, and the pay.

"The truck driver shortage is being driven by a lot of things," Jeff Shefchik, president of Paper Transport Inc., said. "The low unemployment rate throughout the country , it's even lower in Wisconsin. Also the truck driving job is a challenging job."

via www.wearegreenbay.com

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Virginia officially launches truck-only toll study, announces public hearing dates

After SB971 was signed into law in April by Gov. Ralph Northam, the Virginia Commonwealth Transportation Board has been busy getting a study ready that looks into tolls for trucks only and/or high-occupancy vehicles. Recently, the board officially launched the I-81 corridor study, including four public hearings.

On Tuesday, May 15, Nick Donohue, deputy secretary of transportation in Virginia, presented the I-81 Corridor Improvement Plan during the transportation board’s monthly workshop meeting.

via www.landlinemag.com

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FTR’s TCI drops in March, remains carrier-friendly

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — FTR’s Trucking Conditions Index for March dropped from the previous month of 15.41 to a reading of 10.30, FTR said.

This is, however, not indicative of any fundamental change in the current freight demand climate, accoeding to Jonathan Starks, chief intelligence officer at FTR.

Indeed, the year-over-year Trucking Conditions Index remains more than triple the 2017 reading of 2.97, he said, adding that the carrier-favorable environment is not expected to see any real change at least through 2018 with even more positive conditions during the second and third quarter.

via www.thetrucker.com

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With truckers in control, money talks and toilets better sparkle

Once at the mercy of shippers, truckers now are turning the tables, thanks to surging freight demand and a shortage of drivers.

Gone are the days when customers used reliability scorecards to reject some truckers and kept others waiting for hours with no place to take a break but portable canopies and grimy restrooms. Now, companies such as Nestle are rushing to make drivers feel welcome. And shippers that hinder rigs from quick turnarounds or treat operators shabbily are paying a premium.

"Carriers are now starting to score shippers and receivers, and the primary way of keeping score is money," said Cliff Finkle, vice president of Finkle Trucking, a New Jersey-based company with 250 rigs. "I'm just going to say, 'Your place sucks, and if you really want me to go in there, I want an extra $300.' "

via www.theherald-news.com

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Trucking suffers largest monthly job decrease in two and a half years

For the 15th consecutive month, transportation jobs overall scored gains in April, but just barely. The transport sector netted only 400 jobs to the economy, the lowest increase since the last monthly loss in January 2017. Trucking jobs experienced its highest monthly decrease since October 2015 after experiencing two consecutive month of three-year-high increases.

The truck transportation subsector experienced a decrease of 5,500 jobs in April after the industry gained 7,200 in March and 3,000 in February. This marks the highest monthly employment decrease since October 2015, when 5,700 trucking jobs were lost. Numbers for April and March are preliminary and are likely to change in the coming months.

via www.landlinemag.com

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Trucking Alliance pushes for hair testing law to keep opioid abusers from becoming drivers

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Alliance for Driver Safety & Security, also known as the Trucking Alliance, is promoting a new drug testing law that requires all applicants for safety sensitive jobs in the U.S. trucking industry to verify no opioid addiction or illegal drug use, for at least 30 days prior to obtaining employment.

The Trucking Alliance announced its drug test initiative at the United Nations as part of an event titled, “The Use of Technology to Promote Road Safety – The Brazilian Experience.” Brazil requires all commercial truck drivers to pass a hair test before renewing their licenses. More than 1 million Brazilian drivers have either failed the hair test or refused to renew their license since the law took effect two years ago. The UN program can be found at: http://www.itts.org.br/unitednations/ingles.html#portfolio

via www.thetrucker.com

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Updated reports on female representation in trucking

The Women In Trucking Association (WIT) partnered with the National Transportation Institute (NTI) to create an index tracking female representation in the industry.

WIT’s priority is to attract more women to trucking in order to increase the percentage of female professionals, so to more accurately chart these numbers, it partnered with NTI, which specializes in research.

via www.trucker.com

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Trucker Gets Lost in the Woods with Truck Full of Chips, Doesn’t Eat Any

When Oregon truck driver Jacob Cartwright first set out on Tuesday to deliver a shipment of potato chips, he never expected to emerge from the wilderness four days later — on foot.

And, despite being lost in the woods, the 22-year-old didn’t touch the chips he was transporting, said his boss, Roy A. Henry, the owner of Little Trees Transportation.

Cartwright had been driving from Portland to Nyssa, Oregon, a town near the Idaho border, trying to make a delivery by 7:30 a.m. on Wednesday, CNN affiliate KATU reported.

But his GPS system sent him up the wrong road and into a “remote and mountainous location,” the Oregon State Police said.

via fox40.com

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Trucker shortage may drive up Louisiana consumer prices

The nation faces a truck driver shortage, and that may hit your wallet. The American Trucking Association expects a 106,000 driver shortage by 2022. Louisiana Motor Transport Association Executive Director Chance McNeely says it’s causing longer delivery times and higher prices.

"Loads have to wait. It takes longer for goods to get to their location and yes, it drives up the cost of goods. It’s a major challenge for the industry,” said McNeely.

The industry is facing a unique problem in that as the economy expands, more shipping is needed, but McNeely says the number of drivers appears to be dropping, just as demand has begun increasing.

via www.wwl.com

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Revved-Up Trucking Regulations Could Be Costly for Farmers

We focus a lot here at Florida Grower magazine on sharing information to help you grow a good, quality crop. But it’s good to also take a step back and look at all of the many variables that can impact the profitability of your farming operation.

I was reminded of that recently while riding with a grower who lamented the rising costs of transportation to get his produce distributed to the retailers he serves and how pending regulations would make those costs go higher. That U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulation — the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate — is looming, and it has the specialty crop industry particularly concerned about its implications and financial impacts.

via www.growingproduce.com

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